Lo que el pueblo me dice

$12.95

by Jesús Colón
Edited, with an Introduction, by Edwin Karli Padilla Aponte

ISBN: 978-1-55885-330-0
Publication Date: April 30, 2001
Bind: Trade Paperback
Pages: 272

For five decades Jesús Colón, a self-taught intellectual, wrote incisive journalistic commentary from a Hispanic working-class perspective. This is the first compilation of his Spanish-language crónicas (journalistic chronicles of everyday life).

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Jesús Colón was the most prolific and influential Hispanic columnist in early twentieth century New York.  For five decades this self-taught intellectual wrote incisive journalistic commentary from an Hispanic working-class (and later Afro-American) perspective.  Colón was also a political activist who was untiring in organizing immigrant communities.

Lo que el pueblo me dice is the first compilation of his Spanish-language crónicas (journalistic chronicles of everyday life), including the various series that he wrote from the 1920s to the 1940s under the pseudonyms Miquis Tiquis and Pericles Espadas as well as those published under his own name.  The three decades of writing represented reflect the development of the Hispanic community in the city, its primary concerns, hopes and aspirations, as well as its pitfalls and conflicts.

University of Houston Professor Edwin Padilla, who is writing his Ph.D. dissertation on Colón, has provided an excellent introduction with a detailed analysis of the crónicas from within their socio-historical framework.

JESÚS COLÓN (1901-1974) is the author of The Way It Was and Other Writings, a collection of articles on life in the Hispanic communities in New York City (published posthumously in 1994), and the highly acclaimed A Puerto Rican in New York (1961), a collection of autobiographical sketches that presents insight into the Puerto Rican minority status in the United States. Colón was a distinguished activist and newspaper columnist who lived in New York from 1917 until his death in 1974.